Visit the Southwest Fusion of Tradition and Innovation in Art

You will never see such glorious baskets. (We promise.)

Encouraging and supporting this sort of fusion is our Twin Rocks passion!

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The Passion of Southwest Turquoise

Twin Rocks Trading Post offers the finest in American classic turquoise jewelry

New Burnham Turquoise Bracelet set in a Timeless Design.

Gem quality turquoise used in Native American jewelry is a special passion for us here at Twin Rocks Trading Post.  We search far and wide for the best in natural Southwest American turquoise as well as fine quality specimens of Persian and Chinese turquoise.

Turquoise is identified by the mine it comes from. Twin Rocks’ wide selection of classic American turquoise includes Bisbee, Blue Diamond, Blue Gem, Burnham, Carico Lake, Cripple Creek, Damele, Fox, Kingman, Lone Mountain, Morenci, Number 8, Pilot Mountain, Red Mountain, Royston, Sleeping Beauty, Stenech and Turquoise Mountain.

And, we believe in placing turquoise within classic southwestern jewelry settings.  We work with the best Native Southwest silversmiths and goldsmiths, including Will Denetdale, John Begay Jr., John Yazzie, and Eugene Livingston. We love to see their blasts into the past and their experiments that pull us into the future.  (We also work with outstanding turquoise bead artists Ray Lovato, John Huntress, Bruce Eckhardt and Kai Gallagher.)  Our goal is to offer true Native American turquoise craftsmanship in individually designed jewelry treasures.

If you are looking for unique, high-quality turquoise bracelets, earrings, rings, pendants, necklaces and other beautiful objects crafted in sterling silver and 14k gold, look no further. You will not find a better selection anywhere in the Southwest — that is our promise and our guarantee to you.

While exploring the Southwest, seek out one of the best-kept secrets in the United States: Bluff, UT, and Twin Rocks Trading Post and Gallery. For decades we have built loyal clients, and we all benefit from our strong relationships with local artists.

When you visit, stop by the cafe and put your feet up.  Enjoy the Bluffs. Talk to the locals.  Then come down to the Trading Post and Gallery. Feel the passion of the turquoise, and the love that goes into creating one of the finest collections of Native American arts and crafts.

It’s all about the beauty!

Sharing our World through Stories and Art

Navajo Creation stories tell us that people have made a journey through four worlds until they became the animals they are today.

Where did People Come From? Consider the Lovely Ladybug.

Ladybugs, evolution and creation are the themes that Jean B. Cly combined in this gorgeous basket she brought into Twin Rocks.

Navajo people believe that, in their earliest forms, they were ants and various bugs. Through the past four worlds they have changed into the people-animals that they are today.

Through her weavings Jean has led us, and taught us, many of the traditional Navajo legends and stories. Wonderful stories that make our world expand and teach us the possibilities of our imaginations and beliefs.  We believe learning different stories makes us better people.  That it makes us more compassionate beings as we walk this earth we all share.

Thank you, Jean, from the crew at Twin Rocks!

The Heart of the Southwest

Twin Rocks in the the center of all there is to see in the heart of the Southwestern US

All roads lead to Twin Rocks, in amazing Bluff, UT

Why come and visit us at Twin RocksEasy.  You’ll have a great time that is completely unique.

The Twin Rocks Trading Post sits just beneath the Navajo Twins geologic formation in the historic pioneer town of Bluff, Utah. Barry and Steve Simpson, local boys, share their passion for cultural tradition and artistic innovation with both artists and visiting collectors.

Open minds and imagination have resulted in a Navajo basketry renaissance. You’ll also discover one of the finest contemporary Native American turquoise jewelry collections in the world. (No kidding!) And, the Twin Rocks Modern Navajo rug is the first Navajo weaving design innovation in decades.

Pop in.  There’s always a lively conversation going on about the west of old, contemporary Indian art, and travel exploits.  (Tell us yours!)

This is our home. If you have any questions about the Four Corners regional culture and landscape, feel free to ask us.  If we don’t know, we’ll point you in the right direction. When you visit us in Bluff, we promise you a top-notch experience in Native American art and hospitality.

Our friendly team is happy to give you an authentic experience that is comfortable, informative and fun. Like many people we have met over the years, we hope you come through our front door as customers and leave as life-long friends. And, you can always give us a buzz at 1-800-526-3448.

Welcome to our part of the planet, friends. Life will never look quite the same way again.

When Bluff Became a Town

Utah town, Bluff, was founded in 650 A.d.

Welcome to Bluff, UT, founded 650 A.D.

Founded in 650 A.D.?

The first people who lived in Bluff, UT were the Anasazi who left lifetimes of belongings and rock art behind.

The Navajo name for Bluff is “Tselgaii Deez a, or something like “White Rock Point.”  If you still have a regular map, pull it out.  Bluff is in the far S.E. corner of Utah right on the San Juan River.

Prehistoric roads, those that are different and earlier than the Chacoan road system, are in our areaVery cool, indeed.

A rock formation called The Navajo Twins, which is sacred to the Navajo people, stands above nearby Cow Canyon.  It’s also where we got our name, Twin Rocks.

The first white person to explore this area, that we know of, was a zealous Mormon missionary named Jacob Hamblin.  He found Bluff on his way to the Hopi Mesas, hoping to talk the Hopis into moving their pueblo farther north.  (Seriously.)  At any rate, the community was officially founded in 1880.  Bluff is an area that was used as a semi-refuge by Navajos during the time when most were shipped off to the Bosque Redondo.

Then, in 1887, just outside Bluff, trouble reared its head.  A trader, Amassa Barton, was killed by Navajos.  One week later Navajos threatened the Mormon families who had moved to Bluff.  They kept their cool when told that the cavalry would show up.

Bluff has had a colorful past.  Its present is pretty colorful, too.  Anglos and Navajos live, work and trade together.  But as far as the magic the rings the hills and makes a whirring sound?  Only the Navajos can decipher that.  At least that’s what they tell us…