Elegant and Seductive Navajo Pottery

Navajo Pottery is practical and beautiful, making a prize for a collector

Navajo Corn Yei Vase by Kenneth White

The Navajo have made pottery in the Southwest since their arrival here sometime around the 16th century.

But, because people have made pottery since about the beginning of time, it’s a pretty sure bet that they brought pottery with them during their migration. The Navajos made both plain and decorated pottery, and the plain is usually considered to be their old-style.

After the railroads arrived in the Southwest during the 1880’s, the Navajos began weaving more rugs and making less decorated pottery — the rugs were very popular with the travelers who journeyed through our countryside. (No surprise there.  They truly are unsurpassable.)

Today, there’s no need to push your way through a museum to see the old-style pottery. It is still popular today, and you can see fine examples of it at trading posts and galleries.  (At Twin Rocks, we like to consider our collection particularly terrific!)

Navajo pottery is often pear-shaped, conically bottomed, and colored in a reddish brown. It is serviceable and made waterproof by coating it with resin from pinon pine. (Put your nose to the rim and inhale — the smell still lingers, and it is heavenly.) Once the resin permeates the clay, the pot can be placed in hot coals with no loss of the resin or its sealing properties.

The decorations are simple beading or applique. If the pot has the clay beads or fillets, a space or spirit break is included. It might appear as if the potter forgot to include one fillet — no, it is a mystic and intentional part of the design.

Anasazi culture potshards are ground and used as a tempering agent. The pot is built by coiling, shaped by hand with a corn cob and fired in an open pit.  The Wedding Vase, and other styles of vases, are the most popular and they make unique gifts. Navajos also create large jars, but they’re rare — usually the pots are under 12 inches tall.

The love of Navajo pottery has recently surged, a happy event for all. Appliqued decorations include yucca plants, cactus, horned toads, animals, humans, and flowers. Collectors love them, and so do we!

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When Bluff Became a Town

Utah town, Bluff, was founded in 650 A.d.

Welcome to Bluff, UT, founded 650 A.D.

Founded in 650 A.D.?

The first people who lived in Bluff, UT were the Anasazi who left lifetimes of belongings and rock art behind.

The Navajo name for Bluff is “Tselgaii Deez a, or something like “White Rock Point.”  If you still have a regular map, pull it out.  Bluff is in the far S.E. corner of Utah right on the San Juan River.

Prehistoric roads, those that are different and earlier than the Chacoan road system, are in our areaVery cool, indeed.

A rock formation called The Navajo Twins, which is sacred to the Navajo people, stands above nearby Cow Canyon.  It’s also where we got our name, Twin Rocks.

The first white person to explore this area, that we know of, was a zealous Mormon missionary named Jacob Hamblin.  He found Bluff on his way to the Hopi Mesas, hoping to talk the Hopis into moving their pueblo farther north.  (Seriously.)  At any rate, the community was officially founded in 1880.  Bluff is an area that was used as a semi-refuge by Navajos during the time when most were shipped off to the Bosque Redondo.

Then, in 1887, just outside Bluff, trouble reared its head.  A trader, Amassa Barton, was killed by Navajos.  One week later Navajos threatened the Mormon families who had moved to Bluff.  They kept their cool when told that the cavalry would show up.

Bluff has had a colorful past.  Its present is pretty colorful, too.  Anglos and Navajos live, work and trade together.  But as far as the magic the rings the hills and makes a whirring sound?  Only the Navajos can decipher that.  At least that’s what they tell us…